Insects Galore

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Published October 13, 2016 | Updated April 17, 2017
Subject: Science
Season: Fall
Place of Learning: Garden
Resource Type: Lessons
Grade Level: Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2 , Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 5
Uploaded by:
Kaylee Pineault

In this lesson, students draw and label a picture of an insect, learn how to differentiate insects from other bugs, and go out and find three insect specimens from the garden.

Objectives

K-1

  • Students will be able to identify and categorize different types of insects and explain traits and adaptations of each.
  • Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live. 
  • Key Points: Insects are an essential component of all ecosystems! Some are beneficial and some are not. There are many categories of insects.​​

2-3

  • Students will be able to identify and categorize different types of insects and explain traits and adaptations of each.
  • Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.
  • Key Points: Insects are an essential component of all ecosystems! Some are beneficial and some are not. There are many categories of insects.

4-5

  • Students will be able to identify and categorize different types of insects and explain traits and adaptations of each.
  • Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live. 
  • Key Points: Insects are an essential component of all ecosystems! Some are beneficial and some are not. There are many categories of insects.
Materials
Vocabulary
  • Insect
  • Habitat
  • Ecosystem
  • Adaptations
Kindergarten and First Grade

Introduction

In the ecosystem that is our garden, there are so many small bugs (which we will call insects!) Today we are going to talk about, draw, and then look for different kinds of insects in our garden. Some insects help the garden, and some hurt the garden. Let’s find out how to have more GOOD bugs in the garden!

  • Show students a ladybug or ant for a hook

 

Core Lesson: I

Our goal today is to understand how to identify (KNOW) what an insect is, and if it is good or bad for the garden.

  • Hand out student worksheets and have them write/draw along with you here, so that hands are not idle.

Together, we are going to draw and label a large insect, and then we will try to find actual examples in the garden!

KWL for Insects - What are insects that you know of? (Write all answers on board in the K section) What are you wondering about insects? (Write in W section) What will we learn by the end of class?

 

Guided Practice: We

Make sure you are on the insect anatomy section of your worksheet with a big box.

What do you notice about my insect chart? What are some of the main traits of this insect? (Answers should include: Head, eyes, six legs, wings, hard body).

Together let’s draw a basic insect body! INSECTS always have a head, abdomen, eyes, six legs, and sometimes wings. So, worms and spiders are NOT true insects...they are a different kind of bug. 

  • Here, students will draw their own full insect anatomy pictorial chart, and as a class/partners we will label the main body parts (head, eyes, wings, legs, thorax, antennae, abdomen). Kinder will only draw the bug.

 

Independent Practice: You

Friends, now that you know what an insect is, we need to find some! I have set out some bait (fruit, extra food) to attract more insects to the garden. Your job now is to find THREE true insects (not worms, not spiders!) that fit the anatomy we discussed. When you walk around you walk slowly by yourself.

On the back of the worksheet, there is a space for you to draw each insect you see.

  • Teacher demonstrates drawing it after seeing one, and labeling main body parts. 

You can also draw its habitat and what is it eating or doing, as well!

Optional activity - insect BINGO! If you find three insects or more, mark them off on your insect bingo sheet.

Make sure you ask yourself questions as you look so you know if it is a real insect or not! Does it have a head, eyes, body? Does it have an antennae? Does it have six legs? If the answers are YES, then draw it on your chart! Your job is to find at least three today.

 

Closure

Share your findings with a friend. Explain how you knew it was an insect and where you found it!

Some insects are good for the garden and some are not – how do you think we can know if it is helpful or not?

Explain traits of insects and share what students found. IF TIME – hold one insect and walk around class to examine anatomy.

Second Grade through Fifth Grade

Introduction

In the ecosystem that is our garden, there are so many small bugs (Which we will call insects!) Today we are going to talk about, draw, and then look for different kinds of insects in our garden. Some insects help the garden, and some hurt the garden. Let’s find out how to have more GOOD bugs in the garden!

  • Show students a ladybug or ant for a hook

Not all BUGS are true INSECTS! All insects have similar traits. We may accidentally call a spider or a worm an insect, but they are not actually a true one! Your goal today is to know how to correctly identify “true insects” and understand which ones are beneficial and which ones aren’t in the garden. I may even let you exterminate some “bad” bugs!

 

Core Lesson: I

Our goal today is to understand how to identify (KNOW) what an insect is, and if it is good or bad for the garden.

  • Hand out student worksheets and have them write/draw along with you here so that hands are not idle.

Together, we are going to draw and label a large insect, and then we will try to find actual examples in the garden!

KWL for insects – What are insects that you know of? (Write all answers on board in the K section) What are you wondering about insects? (Write in W section) What will we learn by the end of class?

 

Guided Practice: We

Make sure you are on the insect anatomy section of your worksheet with a big box.

What do you notice about my insect chart? What are some of the main traits of this insect? (Answers should include: head, eyes, six legs, wings, hard body).

Together let’s draw a basic insect body! INSECTS always have a head, abdomen, eyes, 6 legs, and sometimes wings. So, worms and spiders are NOT true insects...they are a different kind of bug. Here, students will draw their own full insect anatomy pictorial chart, and as a class/partners we will label the main body parts (head, eyes, wings, legs, thorax, antennae, abdomen).  5th-graders will label and explain main body parts.

Define: anatomy, ecosystem

 

Independent Practice: You

Friends, now that you know what an insect is, we need to find some! I have set out some bait (fruit, extra food) to attract more insects to the garden. Your job now is to find THREE true insects (not worms, not spiders!) that fit the anatomy we discussed. When you walk around you walk slowly by yourself.

On the back of the worksheet, there is a space for you to draw each insect you see. (Teacher demonstrates drawing it after seeing one, and labeling main body parts). You can also draw its habitat and what is what eating or doing as well! You are scientists, and scientists keep field journals. Consider this your field journal for today. For each insect you find, take notes (one sentence) about what it was doing/eating/ etc. (Demonstrate this for one example).

Optional activity - insect BINGO! If you find three insects or more, mark them off on your insect bingo sheet.

Make sure you ask yourself questions as you look so you know if it is a real insect or not! Does it have a head, eyes, body? Does it have an antennae? Does it have six legs? If the answers are YES, then draw it on your chart! Your job is to find at least three today.

 

Closure

Share your findings with a friend. Explain how you knew it was an insect and where you found it!

Some insects are good for the garden and some are not- how do you think we can know if it is helpful or not?

Explain traits of insects and share what students found. IF TIME- walk around garden, show students beneficial and detrimental insects, and get rid of any detrimental ones (e.g. caterpillars, larve, and beetles that eat plants, mainly tomatoes).

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