Food Web

5
Published January 13, 2012 | Updated December 11, 2012
Subject: English, Science, Social Studies
Season: Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall
Place of Learning: Garden Classrooms, School Cafeterias, Academic Classrooms
Resource Type: Lessons
Grade Level: Pre-K, Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2 , Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 5, Grade 6, Grade 7, Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12
Uploaded by:
Brianna Metcalf
Program Affiliations:

In this lesson students work together to learn about everything that is grown on farms and where resources such as cotton or ethanol come from, and how everything is connected.

Objectives

Students will be able to: * Describe different kinds of farms - organic and non-organic, food vs. resource, etc. * Identify the origins of common products * Describe the process and origins of processed foods such as cheese, bread, etc. * Identify how many products can come from a single origin (i.e. a cow can produce, milk, leather, cheese, etc) * Define the ways that certain parts of the farm can benefit each other (i.e. manure can be used for composting)

Materials

*Card stock *Color printer *Scissors * Glue * As many images of farm/agriculture related things as you'd like , as well as one picture of a farm. (Ideas: cows, chickens, pigs, ice cream, cheese, eggs, apples, wheat, ham, hamburgers, trees, corn, soda, bread, clothing, cotton,books, ethanol

Preparation

Print out all of the pictures - I recommend working out from the farm picture - i.e. cows are on a farm, they eat grass, they produce milk and leather and manure. Print pictures of all of these things. Or a picture of wheat or corn, which can produce flour, which is in bread, or ethanol or rubber, etc. I glued my pictures onto card stock to make it more durable. Once all of your card are made, you can start the discussion; tailor it to your age group! It can be made as simple as milk comes from cows for the littler kids, all the way up to a self sustaining farm model for older kids.

Procedures

Introduce the lesson by placing the picture of the farm on the table or blackboard. What would you find on a farm? As the kids come up with ideas, place those pictures around the farm picture. Expand as far as the kids can - if they run out of ideas, give them some tricky questions - show them a picture of a shirt - how can a shirt come from a farm? Etc. One thing that works well is after you have all your pictures up, or even as you're introducing them, finding groups. Group all of the dairy products around the cow. Group all of the compost items around the compost bin. Apples and wood can be placed in the tree group. Explore concepts ! Somethings, like apple pie, can be in several groups - the wheat/grain group, the fruit group, the tree group...ask a student what their favorite food is. Where do the ingredients come from? How many groups are in your favorite food? There is really no right or wrong way to do this lesson - just generate discussion. This is always a favorite with my groups, no matter which grade. We always run out of time and the students leave still talking.

Other Content From Brianna Metcalf

Students learn about good and bad bugs while making a bookmark

Area: Garden Classrooms, Academic Classrooms
Type: Lessons
Rating:
0

Students create a grass 'pet'.

Area: Garden Classrooms, Academic Classrooms
Type: Lessons
Rating:
0

In this lesson the students explore the different parts and functions of a plant.

Area: Garden Classrooms, Kitchen Classrooms
Type: Lessons
Rating:
0