Edible Education 101: "The Chemistry and Biology of the Industrial Food System" with Brenda Eskenazi & Tyrone Hayes

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Published March 17, 2014 | Updated July 16, 2014
Subject: Other
Place of Learning: Academic Classroom
Resource Type: Other
Grade Level: College/University, Adults/Professionals, Other
Uploaded by:
Hannah Piercey
Program Affiliations:

Edible Education 101: The Rise and Future of the Food Movement was a Spring 2014 course at UC Berkeley. The course was co-instructed by Michael Pollan, Knight Professor of Journalism, and Author, Activist, and Filmmaker Raj Patel.

Lecture

UC Berkeley scientists Brenda Eskenazi and Tyrone Hayes discuss their respective studies of the effects of pesticides on our food and water supply

Lecture Video

Lecturers

BRENDA ESKENAZI is the Jennifer and Brian Maxwell Professor of Maternal and Child Health and epidemiology at the University of California, Berkeley and the Principle Investigator and Director of the NIEHS/EPA Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH). She chairs the Division of Community Health and Human Development at the School of Public Health. She is a neuropsychologist and epidemiologist whose long-standing research interest has been the effects of toxicants including lead, solvents, environmental tobacco smoke, dioxin, and pesticides on human reproduction (both male and female) and child development. Professor Eskenazi directs the CHAMACOS study of primarily farmworker families in the Salinas Valley, California. This study works closely with community partners to educate community members about pesticides.

TYRONE HAYES, a biology professor at UC Berkeley since 1995,has been primarily interested in amphibian development and how environmental change affects that development. He studies the interactions between environmental factors and hormones and the subsequent alteration of developmental and evolutionary pathways. Tyrone’s lab discovered that Atrazine—the world's number one selling herbicide and most common contaminant of ground and surface water—is an endocrine disruptor that chemically castrates and feminizes amphibians. A related decrease in testosterone and increase in estrogen production has been identified in all vertebrate classes examined (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, including humans) and likely increases the risk of breast cancer and prostate diseases in rodents and humans. Tyrone is now working to educate the public about these issues and influence policies that can reduce risk to highly susceptible populations such as ethnic minorities, especially laborers in agriculture and pesticide production, as well as endangered species. Tyrone holds a Bachelor of Arts in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Integrative Biology from UC Berkeley.

Lecture Readings
Sponsorships

The Edible Schoolyard Project and UC Berkeley Food Institute, with support from Stephen Silberstein, the Epstein/Roth Foundation, 11th Hour Project, Loker Foundation, and Bar-Lev Associates.

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