Beautiful Bees

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Published October 13, 2016 | Updated March 7, 2017
Subject: Science
Season: Fall
Place of Learning: Garden
Resource Type: Lessons
Grade Level: Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2 , Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 5
Uploaded by:
Kaylee Pineault

In this lesson, students learn about the bee life cycle, bee anatomy, and then explore the garden looking for bees.

Objectives

K-1

  • Students will be able to identify and categorize different types of insects and explain traits and adaptations of each.
  • Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.
  • Key Points: Without pollinators, we would have very few plants!

2-3

  • Students will be able to identify and categorize different types of insects and explain traits and adaptations of each.
  • Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.
  • Key Points: Without pollinators, we would not have enough food in our ecosystem.

4-5

  • Students will be able to identify and categorize different types of insects and explain traits and adaptations of each.
  • Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.
  • Key Points: Without pollinators, we would not have enough food in our ecosystem.
Materials

 

Vocabulary
  • Pollen
  • Pollinator
  • Ecosystem
Kindergarten and First Grade

Introduction

Some of us are a little scared of the bug friend we will discuss today, but we could not live without them – BEES! When I see a bee, I am not scared, I feel love for that bee and for how it helps make food for me and my family. Today, we will study why bees are important and we will carefully look for them in our garden.

Bees give us the wonderful food that is honey, but they also are extremely important for all other food! Let’s discover how this is true.

As a scientist, I am always curious about my environment around me. Today, I am going to use my scientist skills to watch, record, and learn about bees in our garden.

 

Guided Practice: We

Scholars, today we are going to discuss types of bees, draw them, look for them in the garden, and then read a book! SO much to learn about our friends the bees!

  • Chart together on the board (KWL) – Write what students know about bees, want to know, and what our goal is to learn all together on the chart.
  • Show students the bee anatomy chart, and pass out their bee worksheets.

Together let’s discuss bee anatomy and explain how they are adapted (CCD define) to their environment and how they help us! There are many types of bees, such as honey bees, wasps, bumblebees, and carpenter bees.

All bees start as a little EGG! They have a life cycle (Define- CCD) with four stages. On your chart, we will draw and label the eggs phase. Bees live in a honeycomb or nest as small eggs. Then this egg grows into a larva – draw this in stage two and write the word larvae (explain what larvae are). Third, they become a pupa, right after they hatch, and then, an adult that is able to fly!

  • Together, fill in the bee life cycle charts. Spend the most time being detailed with the adult bee

 

Independent Practice: You

  • Read Flight of the Honey Bee all together, asking questions and pointing out where bees would live in our own garden.
  • Flip to back of worksheet with the flower, and have students on their own draw and explain how a bee pollinates a flower, using their anatomy and adaptations knowledge from our core lesson.

 

Closure

  • IF there is time, take five minutes to quietly observe one bee together that Ms. P has safely in a jar. Show where in the garden the bee would pollinate our plants and how.
Second Through Fifth Grade

Introduction

Some of us are a little scared of the bug friend we will discuss today, but we could not live without them – BEES! When I see a bee, I am not scared, I feel love for that bee and for how it helps make food for me and my family. Today, we will study why bees are important and we will carefully look for them in our garden.

Bees give us the wonderful food that is honey, but they also are extremely important for all other food! Let’s discover how this is true.

 

Core Lesson: I

As a scientist, I am always curious about my environment around me. Today, I am going to use my scientist skills to watch, record, and learn about bees in our garden.

Where have you seen bees? What do we do when we see a bee?

  • Explain scientist skills of observation, taking notes, exploration.

 

Guided Practice: We

Scholars, today we are going to discuss types of bees, draw them, look for them in the garden, and then read a book! SO much to learn about our friends the bees!

  • Chart together on the board (KWL) – Write what students know about bees, want to know, and what our goal is to learn all together on chart.
  • Show students the bee anatomy chart, and pass out their bee worksheets.

Together let’s discuss bee anatomy and explain how they are adapted (CCD define) to their environment and how they help us! There are many types of bees, such as honey bees, wasps, bumblebees, and carpenter bees.

All bees start as a little EGG! They have a life cycle (Define- CCD) with four stages. On your chart, we will draw and label the eggs phase. Bees live in a honeycomb or nest as small eggs. Then this egg grows into a larva – draw this in stage two and write the word larvae (explain what larvae are). Third, they become a pupa, right after they hatch, and then an adult that is able to fly!

  • Together, fill in the bee life cycle charts. Spend the most time being detailed with the adult bee

Where do you think bees would live in our garden? Predict! How could we attract new bees to our garden? (Discuss bee shortage in the USA and how students can be bee advocates and protectors).

 

Independent Practice: You

You will now walk around the garden to explore the bee's habitat.

On the back of your worksheet, there are spaces to record where a bee would live/pollinate in our garden, and space to draw how they would do this. You need to walk safely and silently so as not to scare animals away. If you see a bee, let me know and maybe I can get it with our net to see a closer look. When you see one, draw its anatomy and where it was…watch closely so you can see how it uses its legs and body to pollinate! (Define on CCD- pollination). Ten minutes to walk around!

 

Closure

  • Review students findings and share with class. Observe and take notes on all bees that were captured in our net and then release!
  • Maybe read Fight of the Honey Bee if time allows.

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